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Nutrition & Physical Activity

The burden of obesity and the numerous chronic diseases related to it plagues the United States in the form of decreased health and quality of life, and increased health care costs. Due to the extreme toll of obesity, multiple strategies are needed to address these complex issues including the creation of programs to promote individual behavior change, environmental changes and policy changes. Klein Buendel’s (KB) projects have focused on fruit and vegetable consumption and have been aimed at several target audiences including the general adult population, college students, public health practitioners and school-age children.

Healthy Detours

Healthy Detours logo

This phase I project funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DP004995; Fluharty/Myers) will test the feasibility of a smartphone application and companion web program, currently named Healthy Detours, that will help guide college students to healthier eating and exercise choices in their area by providing them with as-you-need-it, location-based decision support technology.

Communities in Balance (BITE)

Balancing Intake and Expenditure

Balancing Intake and Expenditure (BITE) is a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-funded project (DK072725; W. Young) based on the research findings of the BITE Phase I feasibility study, which demonstrated that physical activity and nutrition practitioners are enthusiastic about having access to and using a web site that will help them plan, implement and evaluate community physical activity and nutrition programs. The BITE project is being carried out by researchers at KB in partnership with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors. The goal of BITE is to build and test a dynamic, interactive web program that will assist public health practitioners and their partners as they plan, manage, and evaluate physical activity and nutrition programs that can be repurposed for use with other risk reduction and chronic disease programs. More

Live Fit on Campus

Live Fit on Campus

Live Fit on Campus is a dynamic web-based nutrition and physical activity intervention for college freshmen funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (CA106141; M. Buller). The web site addresses the transition that freshmen experience as they move away from home and become more responsible for their lifestyle choices including the foods they choose and the physical activity they engage in. A randomized trial was conducted with over 800 freshmen at four universities. Participants and campus health administrators were highly satisfied with the web site and those who used the site the most reported eating more vegetables and higher cardio-respiratory fitness at posttest. More

Grow Eat Thrive - Growing Gardens for Health

Grow Eat Thrive

Grow, Eat, Thrive was a USDA-funded project (USDA 2005-33610-16469; L. Stiffler-Meyer) to create and test the effectiveness of an elementary school garden-enhanced nutrition education curriculum. The project created a unit for elementary school children that emphasizes hands-on, interactive and project-based lessons to help students gain an appreciation for healthy food, understand the importance of being active each day and the connection between gardening and healthy eating. This curriculum is now available for use by elementary schools for grades K through five. More

L. Stiffler-Meyer, E.J. Edwards, M.K. Buller, A.L. Dunn, M.A. Keeble, C.A. O’Meara. (2008). Grow, Eat, Thrive – Growing Gardens for Health: A Nutrition Education Curriculum for K-5 Elementary Schools.

Poster presentation at the Colorado Chronic Disease Conference, Colorado Springs, CO. See Poster

M.K. Buller, L. Stiffler-Meyer, A.L. Dunn, M.A. Keeble, E.J. Edwards, G.R. Cutter, H. Gao, D.B. Buller. (2009). Grow, Eat, Thrive – Growing Gardens for Health: Teaching Nutrition and Physical Activity through Gardening in Primary Schools. Presentation at the Annual meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Lisbon, Portugal.

Nutrition Fun

Nutrition Fun

Nutrition Fun was funded by a contract from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 200-2005- 13107; M. Buller) to create and test the effectiveness of a series of three interactive games that addressed common barriers to eating and cooking with fruits and vegetables. The three games - The Virtual Grocery Store, Analyze my Plate and Recipe Re-Mix let users practice skills in shopping for fruits and vegetables, assembling healthy meals and modifying recipes. Two of the three games are now featured on the CDC's More Matters web site. More

Buller M, Kane I, Dunn A.L., Edwards E, Buller D, X Liu. Marketing fruit and vegetable intake with interactive games on the Internet. Social Marketing Quarterly, 2009;15(1):136-154

Active Living Every Day (ALED)

The Active Living Every Day (ALED) Dissemination study was funded by The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (HL86448; A.L. Dunn) to examine the dissemination and implementation of an evidence-based physical activity program at the sector and organizational level. ALED has been widely disseminated to public health organizations, fitness centers, worksites, and medical centers by Human Kinetics, a leading publisher in the physical activity field. This study investigated both the decision-making process that leads organizations to adopt evidence-based programs and the resulting adaptations once the decision to implement such a program has been made.

Dunn, AL, Marcus, BH, Kampert, JB, Garcia, ME, Kohl, HW, III, Blair, SN. Comparison of lifestyle and structured interventions to increase physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness: a randomized trial. JAMA, 1999;281:327-334.

Wilcox S, Dowda M, Leviton LC, Bartlett-Prescott J, Bazzarre T, Campbell-Voytal K, Carpenter RA, Castro CM, Dowdy D, Dunn AL, Griffin SF, Guerra M, King AC, Ory MG, Rheaume C, Tobnick J, Wegley S. Active for life: final results from the translation of two physical activity programs. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2008;35(4):340-351.

Dunn, AL. The effectiveness of lifestyle physical activity interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 2009;3:11S-18S. PMCID: PMC2777660

Dunn AL, Buller DB, Dearing JW, Cutter G, Guerra M, Wilcox S, Bettinghaus EP. Adopting an evidence-based lifestyle physical activity program: dissemination study design and methods. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 2012;2(2):199-208.